mycology
libutron:

Forest food | ©André De Kesel
This brightly colored African chanterelle, Cantharellus platyphyllus (Cantharellales - Cantharellaceae), is much appreciated for food. It grows in seasonally dry forests and lives in symbiosis with the roots of specific African trees (usually Caesalpiniaceae or Phyllantaceae).
This cluster, with mature and young specimens, was photographed in a miombo forest in Katanga, DR Congo.

libutron:

Forest food | ©André De Kesel

This brightly colored African chanterelle, Cantharellus platyphyllus (Cantharellales - Cantharellaceae), is much appreciated for food. It grows in seasonally dry forests and lives in symbiosis with the roots of specific African trees (usually Caesalpiniaceae or Phyllantaceae).

This cluster, with mature and young specimens, was photographed in a miombo forest in Katanga, DR Congo.

mycology
libutron:

Filoboletus manipularis | ©Ken J. Beath   (Bola Creek, Royal NP, Australia)
 Filoboletus manipularis is a strange fungi, from a distance, it looks like some sort of a Mycena species. However, when you take a closer look, there are some significant differences. Most importantly, there are pores to bear the basidiospores where there should be gills.
Filoboletus manipularis is a common mushroom of the tropics in southeast Asia, Australia, and other parts of the old world and new world tropics. There is some evidence that F. manipularis is really a species complex, consisting of two or more “cryptic” species that are “hidden” within this one species.
It has been placed in a variety of other genera, including Poromycena, Favolus, Porolaschia, Laschia, and Mycena. In fact, according to Desjardin et al. (2008), it probably doesn’t belong in *any* of these genera. According to PCR and DNA sequencing studies, all of these genera fall into what is called the “mycenoid clade,” a fancy term for species that are in the genus Mycena or closely related. Further studies indicate that Filoboletus manipularis does not belong with other species of Filoboletus. Yet it also does not belong with Poromycena, Mycena or any other described genus. According to Desjardin et al. this species needs a new genus. 
In any case, this fungus cause a wood decay, probably a white rot. Some of the strains of this species are also bioluminescent, producing their own enzymes that allow them to glow in the dark.
[Source]

libutron:

Filoboletus manipularis | ©Ken J. Beath   (Bola Creek, Royal NP, Australia)

Filoboletus manipularis is a strange fungi, from a distance, it looks like some sort of a Mycena species. However, when you take a closer look, there are some significant differences. Most importantly, there are pores to bear the basidiospores where there should be gills.

Filoboletus manipularis is a common mushroom of the tropics in southeast Asia, Australia, and other parts of the old world and new world tropics. There is some evidence that F. manipularis is really a species complex, consisting of two or more “cryptic” species that are “hidden” within this one species.

It has been placed in a variety of other genera, including Poromycena, Favolus, Porolaschia, Laschia, and Mycena. In fact, according to Desjardin et al. (2008), it probably doesn’t belong in *any* of these genera. According to PCR and DNA sequencing studies, all of these genera fall into what is called the “mycenoid clade,” a fancy term for species that are in the genus Mycena or closely related. Further studies indicate that Filoboletus manipularis does not belong with other species of Filoboletus. Yet it also does not belong with Poromycena, Mycena or any other described genus. According to Desjardin et al. this species needs a new genus. 

In any case, this fungus cause a wood decay, probably a white rot. Some of the strains of this species are also bioluminescent, producing their own enzymes that allow them to glow in the dark.

[Source]