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FUNGUS: The Unbearable Rot of Being

by James Kochalka

Published by Retrofit Comics / Big Planet Comics

Eisner Award-winner James Kochalka presents a forest full of cute but strange fungus creatures that live beneath our feet. This book contains 11 chapters of little fungal creatures ruminating on a variety of topics, including such bizarre mysteries as “comics” and “philosophy”, “cyberspace” and “redemption”. A surreal and funny outside look at the elements of our own reality.

108 pages, black and white, perfect bound

$12

Order here

Debuting at SPX 2014

runningwithlegs
machinegnome:

melinore:

mushroom

More precisely: 
Boletus frostii, commonly known as Frost’s bolete or the apple bolete, is a bolete fungus first described scientifically in 1874. A member of the Boletaceae family, the mushrooms produced by the fungus have tubes and pores instead of gills on the underside of their caps. Boletus frostii is distributed in the eastern United States from Maine to Georgia and Arizona, and south to Mexico and Costa Rica. A mycorrhizal species, its fruit bodies are typically found growing near hardwood trees, especially oak.
Boletus frostii mushrooms can be recognized by their dark red sticky caps, the red pores, the network-like pattern of the stem, and the bluing reaction to tissue injury. Another characteristic of young, moist fruit bodies is the amber-colored drops exuded on the pore surface. Although the mushrooms are considered edible, they are generally not recommended for consumption because of the risk of confusion with other poisonous red-pored, blue-bruising boletes. B. frostii may be distinguished from other superficially similar red-capped boletes by differences in distribution, associated tree species, bluing reaction, or morphology.

machinegnome:

melinore:

mushroom

More precisely: 

Boletus frostii, commonly known as Frost’s bolete or the apple bolete, is a bolete fungus first described scientifically in 1874. A member of the Boletaceae family, the mushrooms produced by the fungus have tubes and pores instead of gills on the underside of their caps. Boletus frostii is distributed in the eastern United States from Maine to Georgia and Arizona, and south to Mexico and Costa Rica. A mycorrhizal species, its fruit bodies are typically found growing near hardwood trees, especially oak.

Boletus frostii mushrooms can be recognized by their dark red sticky caps, the red pores, the network-like pattern of the stem, and the bluing reaction to tissue injury. Another characteristic of young, moist fruit bodies is the amber-colored drops exuded on the pore surface. Although the mushrooms are considered edible, they are generally not recommended for consumption because of the risk of confusion with other poisonous red-pored, blue-bruising boletes. B. frostii may be distinguished from other superficially similar red-capped boletes by differences in distribution, associated tree species, bluing reaction, or morphology.

justaquickquestion
libutron:

Mycena amicta 
With a cap just 5 to 15 mm in diameter, these small fungi belonging to the species Mycena amicta (Mycenaceae), sometimes have a striking olivaceous, greenish or bluish green shade. The base of the stipe usually is somewhat blue-green, but sometimes it can be entirely blue.
The species grows solitary, scattered, to occasionally clustered on conifer logs (often under the bark) in montane regions of North America and Europe.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Tatiana Bulyonkova | Locality: Novosibirskaya Oblast, Russia (2012)

libutron:

Mycena amicta 

With a cap just 5 to 15 mm in diameter, these small fungi belonging to the species Mycena amicta (Mycenaceae), sometimes have a striking olivaceous, greenish or bluish green shade. The base of the stipe usually is somewhat blue-green, but sometimes it can be entirely blue.

The species grows solitary, scattered, to occasionally clustered on conifer logs (often under the bark) in montane regions of North America and Europe.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Tatiana Bulyonkova | Locality: Novosibirskaya Oblast, Russia (2012)