runningwithlegs
machinegnome:

melinore:

mushroom

More precisely: 
Boletus frostii, commonly known as Frost’s bolete or the apple bolete, is a bolete fungus first described scientifically in 1874. A member of the Boletaceae family, the mushrooms produced by the fungus have tubes and pores instead of gills on the underside of their caps. Boletus frostii is distributed in the eastern United States from Maine to Georgia and Arizona, and south to Mexico and Costa Rica. A mycorrhizal species, its fruit bodies are typically found growing near hardwood trees, especially oak.
Boletus frostii mushrooms can be recognized by their dark red sticky caps, the red pores, the network-like pattern of the stem, and the bluing reaction to tissue injury. Another characteristic of young, moist fruit bodies is the amber-colored drops exuded on the pore surface. Although the mushrooms are considered edible, they are generally not recommended for consumption because of the risk of confusion with other poisonous red-pored, blue-bruising boletes. B. frostii may be distinguished from other superficially similar red-capped boletes by differences in distribution, associated tree species, bluing reaction, or morphology.

machinegnome:

melinore:

mushroom

More precisely: 

Boletus frostii, commonly known as Frost’s bolete or the apple bolete, is a bolete fungus first described scientifically in 1874. A member of the Boletaceae family, the mushrooms produced by the fungus have tubes and pores instead of gills on the underside of their caps. Boletus frostii is distributed in the eastern United States from Maine to Georgia and Arizona, and south to Mexico and Costa Rica. A mycorrhizal species, its fruit bodies are typically found growing near hardwood trees, especially oak.

Boletus frostii mushrooms can be recognized by their dark red sticky caps, the red pores, the network-like pattern of the stem, and the bluing reaction to tissue injury. Another characteristic of young, moist fruit bodies is the amber-colored drops exuded on the pore surface. Although the mushrooms are considered edible, they are generally not recommended for consumption because of the risk of confusion with other poisonous red-pored, blue-bruising boletes. B. frostii may be distinguished from other superficially similar red-capped boletes by differences in distribution, associated tree species, bluing reaction, or morphology.

justaquickquestion
libutron:

Mycena amicta 
With a cap just 5 to 15 mm in diameter, these small fungi belonging to the species Mycena amicta (Mycenaceae), sometimes have a striking olivaceous, greenish or bluish green shade. The base of the stipe usually is somewhat blue-green, but sometimes it can be entirely blue.
The species grows solitary, scattered, to occasionally clustered on conifer logs (often under the bark) in montane regions of North America and Europe.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Tatiana Bulyonkova | Locality: Novosibirskaya Oblast, Russia (2012)

libutron:

Mycena amicta 

With a cap just 5 to 15 mm in diameter, these small fungi belonging to the species Mycena amicta (Mycenaceae), sometimes have a striking olivaceous, greenish or bluish green shade. The base of the stipe usually is somewhat blue-green, but sometimes it can be entirely blue.

The species grows solitary, scattered, to occasionally clustered on conifer logs (often under the bark) in montane regions of North America and Europe.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Tatiana Bulyonkova | Locality: Novosibirskaya Oblast, Russia (2012)

mycology
libutron:

Puffball Lycoperdon sp. releasing spores
Spore discharge from puff-balls of the Lycoperdon type (Agaricaceae) can be brought about by impact of water drops on the flattened papery top of the endoperidium (the inner of the two layers into which the sack that encloses a mass of spores is divided).
Raindrops of 1 mm. diameter or over, and rain-drip from trees are adequate to operate the mechanism. Analysis of the operation by ultra-high-speed photographs have shown that the puff reaches a height of a centimeter in approximately one-hundredth of a second after impact. The velocity of the puff on emerging from the ostiole (aperture) is of the order of 100 cm/sec.
The endoperidium (sack) is normally water-proof and ejection continues under humid conditions. Estimates, made from meteorological data, show that a fruit body must be operated many thousands of times in a season. 
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Marco Bertolini | Locality: unknown

libutron:

Puffball Lycoperdon sp. releasing spores

Spore discharge from puff-balls of the Lycoperdon type (Agaricaceae) can be brought about by impact of water drops on the flattened papery top of the endoperidium (the inner of the two layers into which the sack that encloses a mass of spores is divided).

Raindrops of 1 mm. diameter or over, and rain-drip from trees are adequate to operate the mechanism. Analysis of the operation by ultra-high-speed photographs have shown that the puff reaches a height of a centimeter in approximately one-hundredth of a second after impact. The velocity of the puff on emerging from the ostiole (aperture) is of the order of 100 cm/sec.

The endoperidium (sack) is normally water-proof and ejection continues under humid conditions. Estimates, made from meteorological data, show that a fruit body must be operated many thousands of times in a season. 

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Marco Bertolini | Locality: unknown